Non Importation Agreements Apush

The impact of the Boston non-import agreement and all similar agreements has been considerable. About 60 merchants and merchants signed the agreement on August 1, 1768, and within two weeks, all but sixteen Boston merchants, merchants and business owners had joined the boycott. Boston craftsmen, craftsmen and other merchants signed the agreement with joy in the hope that the boycott would generate business for them. In the space of weeks and months, almost all ports and regions of the Thirteen Colonies adopted similar boycotts to protest and undermine the Townshend Revenue Act, although many merchants and traders in the South with loyalist tendencies refused to cooperate. Smuggling was widespread in the colonies. The effects of British merchants who acted with the American colonies were alarming. Traders lost money that shipped their goods to the colonies, where they would not be received. Most of the time, the goods were never left ashore. If they were, they would rot on the docks or in warehouses, or were looted by the settlers.

The situation was a nightmare for customs officers who could not collect taxes on goods that were not left ashore or were never sold. A handy colonial protest instrument was the non-import agreement. Imported goods, such as British wool and flax, would be boycotted. Groups like the Sons of Liberty would impose these boycotts. The same group would stage the deepest demonstration in Boston Harbour by destroying 342 cans of tea shipped by the powerful British East India Company. The Boston Tea Party urged Parliament to severely punish Boston and the Massachusetts colony. As early as 1766, the practice of non-import agreements against the importation and trade with Great Britain of the cities of the American colonies was adopted. The sons of freedom were proponents of the application of non-import agreements and other similar boycott tactics. The Stamp Act was repealed because of joint non-import agreements by U.S. colonies. New York merchants first implemented the non-import agreement to protest the Stamp Act, and they managed to convince merchants in other cities to do the same. Boston was one of the new York merchant cities that were convinced to participate in the non-import agreement to fight the Stamp Act.